characidae

  1. African red-eyed tetra species profile

    African red-eyed tetra species profile

    By Aquarium_tropical_du_Palais_de_la_Porte_Dorée_-_Phenacogrammus_interruptus.jpg: KoSderivative work: Haplochromis (talk) - Aquarium_tropical_du_Palais_de_la_Porte_Dorée_-_Phenacogrammus_interruptus.jpg, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=14888040 A schooling fish...
  2. Long-finned tetra species profile

    Long-finned tetra species profile

    By Hardyplants - Own work, CC BY-SA 4.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=52828476 A schooling fish, so should be kept in groups of 6+ of their own species.
  3. Jelly bean tetra species profile

    Jelly bean tetra species profile

    By Cedricguppy - Loury Cédric - Own work, CC BY-SA 4.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=41248209 A schooling fish, so should be kept in groups of 6+ of their own species. Females are rounder-bodied, while males have longer fins.
  4. Emperor tetra species profile

    Emperor tetra species profile

    Female emperor tetra By Sitron - Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=7614304 Male emperor tetra CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=264747 A schooling fish, so should be kept in groups of 6+ of their own species. Males have blue...
  5. Anders247

    Rainbow tetra species profile

    http://www.seriouslyfish.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/11/Nematobrycon-lacortei-311365.jpg A schooling fish, so should be kept in groups of 6+ of their own species. Males have red eyes and have longer fins than females. Females have blue-green eyes and are more fuller-bodied than males.
  6. Bloodfin tetra species profile

    Bloodfin tetra species profile

    By VGW2006 at en.wikipedia - Transferred from en.wikipedia, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=16059283 A schooling fish, so they should be kept in groups of 6+ of their own species. Females are thicker than males. They are very hardy and can live up to 10 years.
  7. Redflank bloodfin species profile

    Redflank bloodfin species profile

    Source: http://atlas.elacuarista.com/peces/ficha/aphyocharax-rathbuni-eigenmann-1907 A schooling fish, so should be kept in groups of 6+ of their own species. Males are more narrow-bodied than females.
  8. Dawn tetra species profile

    Dawn tetra species profile

    By Pascal Hablutzel- http://www.fishbase.org/collaborators/CollaboratorSummary.php?id=2094 A schooling fish, so should be kept in groups of 6+ of their own species. Males have more deeply colored marks on their anal fins than females, and female are more fuller-bodied.
  9. Discus tetra species profile

    Discus tetra species profile

    By Francis de Laporte de Castelnau - Expédition dans les parties centrales de l'Amérique du Sud, de Rio de Janeiro à Lima et de Lima au Para sous la direction du Comte Francis de Castelnau , 1856 (exemplaire de la bibliothèque patrimoniale de Gray (France)), Public Domain...
  10. Tucano tetra species profile

    Tucano tetra species profile

    A schooling fish, so should be kept in groups of 6+ of their own species. Males are more colorful than females, and females are rounder-bodied than males. Uncommon in the hobby.
  11. Anders247

    Hummingbird tetra species profile

    For now this link will have to do, until I get permission to use a picture https://insearchofsmallthings.com/trochilocharax-ornatus-2/ A shoaling fish, but should still be maintained in groups of 6+ of its own species. Males are larger and more colorful, females being rounder-bodied.
  12. Ruby tetra species profile

    Ruby tetra species profile

    They are the smaller reddish fish in the back. Here is a closer picture: http://www.seriouslyfish.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/03/Axelrodia-riesei-HW-2.jpg A schooling fish, so should be kept in groups of 6+ of their own species. Males are more colorful and smaller than females, females are...
  13. Anders247

    Pepper tetra species profile

    A schooling fish, so should be kept in groups of 6+ of their own species. Females are more rounder-bodied compared to males. Here is a linked picture: http://www.seriouslyfish.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/03/Axelrodia-stigmatias-RK-1.jpg
  14. Yellow-tailed African tetra species profile

    Yellow-tailed African tetra species profile

    By Zappster - Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=5706833 By Zaire at German Wikipedia, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=14887951 A schooling fish, so should be kept in groups of 6+ of its own species. Males are larger and...
  15. Anders247

    Blue diamond tetra species profile

    A schooling fish, so should be kept in groups of 6+ of its own species. Males are more colorful and larger than females.
  16. Anders247

    Cherry red congo tetra species profile

    A schooling fish, so should be kept in groups of 6+ of their own species. Males are more colorful and also have longer anal, dorsal, and ventral fins.
  17. Six-eyed tetra species profile

    Six-eyed tetra species profile

    By Raul Costa Pereira http://www.fishbase.se/photos/UploadedBy.php?autoctr=14067&win=uploaded A schooling fish, so should be kept in groups of 6+ of their own species.
  18. Red line lizard tetra species profile

    Red line lizard tetra species profile

    By Martin Taylor A schooling fish, so should be kept in groups of 6+ of their own species. It is unknown how to sex them. It is sensitive to poor water conditions, always introduce to an established tank.
  19. Anders247

    Iguanodectes variatus species profile

    A schooling fish, so should be kept in groups of 6+ of their own species. No data on how to sex them.
  20. Green line lizard tetra species profile

    Green line lizard tetra species profile

    By catxcatt - A schooling fish, so should be kept in groups of 6+ of their own species. Difficult to sex. Females may be fuller in the body than males. They are sensitive to poor water conditions, always introduce to an established tank.
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